editorial photography

Seattle Photographer – Wayne Horvitz – Sound check

waynehorvitz
I photographed Wayne Horvitz during a sound check before his performance at the 2006 Earshot Jazz Festival at the Triple Door. He was laying with the Gravitas Quartet. A beautiful group. What I really like about this photograph is the backlight making almost a complete silhouette. It is really nice to have access to different angles during a soundcheck instead of shooting from the audience. I am going to add this to my editorial website splash page. I like the feeling of it. Maybe it is too quiet?

Photograph by photojournalist Daniel Sheehan specializing in portrait photography for publications and corporations and a photographer in Seattle with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating award winning wedding photography.

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Sean Jones

seanjones

Sean Jones playing at the Triple Door with the Roosevelt H.S. Jazz Band on the opening nght of the Earshot Jazz festival Oct 18th 2008.

Over the course of his first three albums for the Mack Avenue Records label, trumpeter Sean Jones has revealed himself as among the most immensely expressive, versatile and gifted players of his generation. With each new project, the Warren, Ohio native has peeled back another layer to show us a fresh peek at his soul. His 2004 solo debut, Eternal Journey (recorded when he was 25) introduced Sean as a deft expresser of modern bop for the 21st century via originals and standards in a quintet format. His sophomore effort, Gemini, found him deftly mixing soul and funk flourishes with bop, proving he was not adverse to more contemporary textures. His last album, Roots, reflects his love of the music of the church, which he grew up singing as a child.

Now with his fourth and equally impressive release Kaleidoscope, Sean Jones adds another hue to his ever-expanding musical palette – showcasing the voices and song selections of an amazing assemblage of five top-flight singers: Gretchen Parlato, Carolyn Perteete, Sachal Vasandani, J.D. Walter, and contemporary gospel powerhouse Kim Burrell. Most of them are unknown to the majority of listeners…but not for long if Sean can help it.

“The concept of this record basically happened during a break in the sessions for Roots,” Sean shares. “(Producer) Al Pryor said it would be cool if I recorded with some vocalists next time. I was open to that, but I didn’t want to do a typical vocal record. I didn’t want that soft, run-of-the-mill love song thing you hear on the radio. And I didn’t want to grab a bunch of stars just to sell records. I wanted to create a document celebrating the vocalists of my generation – a hard-hitting project that would allow me to superimpose my sound on top of their dynamic styles.”

The instantly striking aspect of this concept is the utter generosity and deference Jones gave to both his guest vocalists and band members. “This is a collaborative project,” he states. “I believe that there is power in numbers and power in a generation, not in individuals. When I look at jazz and music in general, combined forces are much more effective than one person trying to make their testament alone. True, I am soloing on every song and there is space for me to shine but, I was more concerned with celebrating these gifted composers and vocalists. I titled the album Kaleidoscope because these artists represent the colors of my generation. And I see myself as a thread among them.”

Kaleidoscope’s opening number, “Allison,” sets the stage for Jones’ arresting first vocal forays. The piece opens as a soft, floating instrumental gradually building in intensity then introduces J.D. Walter singing a soaring wordless vocal reminiscent of the work of the pan-cultural Pat Metheny Group. “That tune is a mood,” Sean says, “a bridge built to prepare listeners for what they’re about to hear – a fresh segue from everything I’ve already done.” Regarding the title, Sean adds, “Everyone in the studio knew an Allison so we called it ‘Allison’ – a universal thing.”

The final piece is a rolling and tumbling composition of vitality from the pen of Sean’s right hand – pianist Orrin Evans – titled “The Sluice” and featuring the explosive drumming of Obed Calvaire. “A Sluice is a pathway that brings the good water from one source to another,” Sean explains. “Orrin and I dedicate that song to Professor Ralph Bowen, through whom a continuum of nothing but the good stuff flows whenever he plays.”

The same can be said of Sean Jones, a player whose style reflects Clifford Brown for technical facility, Freddie Hubbard for flowing, lyrical lines, Woody Shaw for his intervalistic approach, and Miles Davis for leadership in forward thinking and contouring the music of the eras around his singular style. Indeed, it was after a teacher gave Sean – then a fifth grader – copies of Davis’ albums Kind of Blue (1959) and Tutu (1986) that he was hooked on trumpet immediately. Lessons learned under Professor Bill Fielder were of infinite guidance to young Sean as were high school studies with Esotto Pellegrini, which led to Sean earning an undergraduate degree in classical trumpet.

Notes on Sam and his  album from Sean Jones’ website www.seanjonesmusic.com

Photograph by Seattle photographer and photojournalist Daniel Sheehan specializing in portrait photography for publications and corporations and  photographers in Seattle with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating award winning  bridal photography.


Doug Wieselman


Doug Wieselman playing with Robin Holcomb: Larks, They Crazy Sunday, November 2, Seattle Art Museum

Robin Holcomb shared the bill with Horvitz/Miles/Previte Trio Sunday night. Her playing and singing were a special treat. I was lulled and then moved in some of the more stirring pieces. The pianist/composer/singer performed a reprise of her 1989 landmark Sound Aspects release, Larks, They Crazy. The album featured many of the top-working musicians in New York, including Horvitz, Previte, Marty Ehrlich, Doug Wieselman, and David Hofstra. Like Todos Santos, the album gathered much attention upon its release. Featuring some truly ambitious music, the drama of her compositions well deserves revisiting. Mark Dery of The New York Times wrote: “Ms. Holcomb has done something remarkable here: she has created a new American regionalism, spun from many threads – country rock, minimalism, Civil War songs, Baptist hymns, Appalachian folk tunes, even the polytonal music of Charles Ives. The music that results is as elegantly simple as a Shaker quilt, and no less beautiful.”
Holcomb was joined on stage here by the expansive, irrepressible Skerik on tenor saxophone, old New York friend Doug Wieselman on alto, D’Vonne Lewis on drums, and Geoff Harper on bass.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

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Wayne Horvitz


Wayne Horvitz plays with Pigpen & Zony Mash w/ Horns Saturday, November 1 Tractor Tavern

Kicking off the 20-year retrospective of Seattle resident and master composer/
keyboardist Wayne Horvitz is the recreation of two of his most exciting ensembles – Pigpen and Zony Mash with Horns.
Pigpen marked the beginning of a long-term music partnership between Horvitz and alto saxophonist Briggan Krauss. The band also featured bassist Fred Chalenor and drummer Mike Stone, and between 1992 and 1996, Pigpen released four full lengths and one live album as it toured rock clubs across the Pacific Northwest, though it also visited Canada, the east coast, and Europe. As Jeff Daniel described in Pandemonium, “If I had to guess what this was, without looking at the press kit, I would probably say something like, four guys locked into a studio with all this gear, lots of food, LSD, some pot, and a madman with something new to prove. This one’s a keeper!”
Performing “modern electric jazz-funk at its finest” (Jazz Times), Zony Mash made its debut in 1995 as the unofficial house band at the OK Hotel in Seattle. Guided by Horvitz’s unique compositional and harmonic sensibilities, Zony Mash explored psychedelic rock, the blues, and outer space as it released several albums to great critical acclaim. While the initial line-up featured Wayne Horvitz on Hammond B-3 and keyboards, Timothy Young on guitar, Fred Chalenor on bass (later replaced by Keith Lowe), and Andy Roth on drums, Zony Mash will here be augmented by a superb horn section, adding more depth and excitement to an already thrilling ensemble: Ron Miles, cornet; Briggan Krauss, Doug Wieselman, Skerik, saxophones; and Steve Moore, trombone.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  portrait photographer Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in editorial photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best photographers Seattle.

 

 

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Larry Ochs


Larry Ochs Sax and Drumming Core Saturday, November 1, Seattle Art Museum

ROVA’s Larry Ochs leads an all-star ensemble consisting of percussionists Scott Amendola and Don Robinson
and special guests from Tokyo, pianist Satoko Fujii and her trumpeter husband, Natsuki Tamura. Together they perform what they describe as “a meditation on and a 21st-century distillation
of the songs of American and eastern-European blues-shouters, and of traditional chant-singers from Asia and Africa.”
This is music loaded with playful musical dialogue and melodic, polyrhythmic
exchanges. At once thunderous
and subtle, sweet and dramatic, Larry Ochs Drum Core offers, as one critic wrote, “everything great music should offer: true emotions, adventure, variation, interplay, tension, surprise, and entertainment.” Augmented here by the wildly-creative Fujii, one of the most original voices on her instrument, and the equally-compelling Tamura, this special performance will feature both familiar and unfamiliar musical dialects presented in a concert like none other.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best  wedding photographers Seattle.

 

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Marcin Wasilewski Trio



Marcin Wasilewski
Saturday, November 1, Triple Door

One of the most refreshing ensembles in contemporary jazz, the piano trio of Marcin Wasilewski, Slawomir Kurkiewicz, and Michal Miskiewicz have come a long way since its formation in Poland fifteen years ago. Having developed at the young age of sixteen what would be a long-standing relationship with compatriot and acclaimed-trumpeter Tomasz Stańko, Wasilewski, and his trio, has exhibited incredible growth that has been tangible nearly every step of the way. Contributing greatly to several of Stańko’s most sublime records, and now seeking success as an autonomous unit, the Wasilewski Trio is a force on the international jazz scene, and it is certain to bring something remarkable to Seattle.
As Wasilewski reported to All About Jazz, “The music is always evolving; I don’t know when it will stop, but I hope never.” Similarly, Stańko testified that “in the entire history of Polish jazz we’ve never had a band like this one. They just keep getting better and better.” Indeed, with invigorating energy, demonstrated sensitivity and communicativeness, and a great love for adventure, the Wasilewski Trio comes to Seattle at the peak of its power – thus far.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by Seattle photographer Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist specializing in jazz photography, photojournalism and portrait photography for publications and corporations. 

 

 

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James Moody


Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra with James Moody

Saturday, November 1, Nordstrom Recital Hall/Benaroya Hall
Sunday, November 2, Kirkland Performance Center

Saxophonist, flautist, NEA Jazz Master,
and American institution James Moody teams up with the star-studded
Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra, co-led by Clarence Acox and Michael Brockman, to explore the rich history of Moody’s work.
Born in Savannah, Georgia and raised in Newark, New Jersey, Moody took up the alto saxophone as teenager. In 1946, he joined the seminal Dizzy Gillespie Big Band, during which time he developed his improvisational skills and composed an impressive repertoire of work. He also appeared regularly with and wrote music for Miles Davis, Lionel Hampton, Benny Carter, Thelonious Monk, Sonny Stitt, and Oscar Peterson, among many other jazz luminaries.
Consistently ranked as one of the leading jazz artists of our time, Moody’s compositions reflect a resonance and wit that honor his bebop roots while blazing new musical paths. Today he is considered one of the most expressive and enduring figures in modern jazz.
The Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra is the Northwest’s premier big band jazz ensemble. Founded in 1995, the 17-piece band is made up of the region’s leading jazz instrumentalists, both young and old. Committed to presenting the great works of jazz, the SRJO’s repertoire is drawn from the past 100 years of jazz history, including works by Fletcher Henderson, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones, and of course, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. With this concert they continue this tradition by performing the compositions of James Moody.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best  wedding photographers Seattle.

 

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Lance Buller


Lance Buller with the Floyd Standifer Tribute: Legacy Band
Wednesday, October 29, New Orleans Creole Restaurant
Lance Buller playing Weds night with the tribute band to Floyd Standifer with a photo of Floyd on the wall behinf him looking down on the band.
To celebrate the legacy of the late Floyd Standifer, who for several decades was one of the region’s most influential, talented, and admired jazzmen, the new lineup of the band he headed for many years at the New Orleans Creole Restaurant salutes him. Joining drummer Clarence Acox and his quartet are alumni from Floyd’s time with the band, including guitarist Robin Kuntz.
Clarence Acox is an ambassador of the Seattle jazz scene with impeccable credentials.
His experience includes a 37-year tenure as the director of the award-winning Garfield High School jazz program. He also leads the Seattle University jazz ensemble and co-founded the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra.
A native of New Orleans, Acox came to Seattle in 1971 straight out of Southern University after Garfield High School had recruited him to revive its moribund music program. Since then, Garfield’s jazz ensemble has twice taken first place at the Lincoln Center’s Essentially Ellington National Jazz Band Competition in New York.
For many years, Acox was the rock-solid drummer of the Floyd Standifer Quartet as it held down a weekly slot at the New Orleans; earlier this year, Acox stepped up to lead a new incarnation of the band, now known as the Legacy Band. With regulars Bill Anschell on piano, Phils Sparks on bass, and Acox on drums, this Wednesday night tradition is in its 22nd year, making it the longest running continuous gig in Seattle.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival


Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best photographers in Seattle.

 

 

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Richard Bona

This blog, eyeshotjazz.wordpress.com is ending here at wordpress.com, but will continue to be updated at the new address for EyeShotJazz at http://www.eyeshotjazz.com/. Please go and set your bookmark to continue to follow the work of Jazz Photographer Daniel Sheehan. Here is the final posting to this site. Also visit his newest website http://www.eyeshotphotos.com to see samples of all of his work as a Seattle Photographer.


Richard Bona Quartet

Wednesday, October 29, Triple Door

Bassist and vocalist Richard Bona has dazzled audiences around the world with his engaging personal style, which merges jazz, pop, afro-beat, bossa nova, and funk. Considered one of the best bassists of his generation, Bona is known as a masterful musician and compelling storyteller.
Born in Minta in eastern Cameroon, Bona was drawn to music as a child and often experimented with his own self-made instruments, including a twelve-string guitar constructed of wood and bicycle brake cables. In 1980, at the age of thirteen, he discovered jazz. Inspired by Weather Report’s Jaco Pastorius, Bona decided to reinvent himself as a bass player. In pursuit of a professional jazz career, he moved to Düsseldorf, then Paris, and finally New York, where he now lives.
Much in demand as a collaborator, Bona has worked with musicians as diverse as Michael Brecker, Herbie Hancock, Bobby McFerrin, Paul Simon,
Chaka Khan, Tito Puente, Eddie Palmieri, Chucho Valdes, Joni Mitchell,
Harry Connick Jr., and Queen Latifah.
He has recorded six albums as a leader, including Tiki (2005), which received a 2007 Grammy nomination in the contemporary world music category. In March he released Bona Makes You Sweat, which was recorded live in Hungary.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best photographers in Seattle.

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Floyd Standifer Tribute: Legacy Band


Floyd Standifer Tribute: Legacy Band
Wednesday, October 29, New Orleans Creole Restaurant

To celebrate the legacy of the late Floyd Standifer, who for several decades was one of the region’s most influential, talented, and admired jazzmen, the new lineup of the band he headed for many years at the New Orleans Creole Restaurant salutes him. Joining drummer Clarence Acox and his quartet are alumni from Floyd’s time with the band, including guitarist Robin Kuntz.
Clarence Acox is an ambassador of the Seattle jazz scene with impeccable credentials.
His experience includes a 37-year tenure as the director of the award-winning Garfield High School jazz program. He also leads the Seattle University jazz ensemble and co-founded the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra.
A native of New Orleans, Acox came to Seattle in 1971 straight out of Southern University after Garfield High School had recruited him to revive its moribund music program. Since then, Garfield’s jazz ensemble has twice taken first place at the Lincoln Center’s Essentially Ellington National Jazz Band Competition in New York.
For many years, Acox was the rock-solid drummer of the Floyd Standifer Quartet as it held down a weekly slot at the New Orleans; earlier this year, Acox stepped up to lead a new incarnation of the band, now known as the Legacy Band. With regulars Bill Anschell on piano, Phils Sparks on bass, and Acox on drums, this Wednesday night tradition is in its 22nd year, making it the longest running continuous gig in Seattle.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by editorial photographer Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a Seattle  photographer of weddings with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best bridal photographers in Seattle.

Photograph by editorial photographer Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a Seattle  photographer of weddings with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best  photographers in Seattle.

 

 


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Peter Apfelbaum

Peter Apfelbaum & New York Hieroglyphics featuring Abdoulaye Diabate Tuesday, October 28, Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center

Apfelbaum’s reformulated Hieroglyphics Ensemble, a tentet now based in New York, performs the original piece Aural Histories, composed with a Chamber Music America/Doris Duke Foundation grant. In each of the piece’s sections, a band member improvises over a composed background while Malian griot Abdoulaye Diabate sings a narrative of that particular musician’s life.
A leading figure in the world-jazz movement, Peter Apfelbaum has always gravitated to transporting melodies and timbres and to a group dynamic that emphasizes extended improvisation over jazz-infused West African and Afro-Caribbean styles. The Guardian called the results, in Aural Histories, “positively fire-spitting.”
With Peter Apfelbaum (tenor sax, piano, percussion) and vocalist Abdoulaye Diabate, who hails from a long family tradition of griots and has also performed in the West with the likes of jazzmen Don Byron and guitarist-folklorist Banning Eyre, are: Peck Allmond (trumpet, reeds), Josh Roseman (trombome), Jessica Jones (tenor sax, flute), Tony Jones (tenor sax), Charles Burnham (violin), David Phelps (guitar), Patrice Blanchard (bass), and – a show unto himself – Dafnis Prieto on drums.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by Paul Joseph Brown a photojournalist for the Seattle Post Intelligencer. He is also a Seattle wedding photographer photographing weddings with A Beautiful Day Photography group of  Seattle wedding photographers.


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Mark Taylor Quartet

Mark Taylor Quartet Monday, October 27, Tula’s Restaurant
The scene at Tulas with alto saxophonist Mark Taylor, always a standout, celebrating his new CD release, as part of Earshot Jazz Festival.
A Seattle native and resident, Taylor is one of the most in-demand saxophonists in the Pacific Northwest. He formed his quartet with Los Angeles-based pianist Gary Fukushima fifteen years after they met as music students at the University of Washington, where the pair studied together before Taylor left to attend the Manhattan School of Music. In New York, Taylor earned not just his master’s degree, but a regular spot in the front row of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the house band that plays Monday nights at the famous Greenwich Village club. In 2000 he returned to Seattle, where he and Fukushima, along with bassist Jeff Johnson and drummer Byron Vannoy, recorded their first album together as the Mark Taylor Quartet. The group is now known throughout the Emerald City for its invigorating performances.
Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by editorial photographer Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a Seattle  photographer of weddings with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best bridal photographers in Seattle.

 

 

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