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Jazz Photographs – Travis Shook Comeback

This blog, eyeshotjazz.wordpress.com is ending here at wordpress.com, but will continue to be updated at the new address for EyeShotJazz at http://www.eyeshotjazz.com/. Please go and set your bookmark to continue to follow the work of Jazz Photographer Daniel Sheehan. Visit his newest website to see samples of all of his work at EyeshotPhotos Seattle Photographers Portfolio.

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Travis Shook made his comeback to the Seattle jazz scene at Tula’s Jazz Club last Wednesday night, playing in town for the first time in about five years. His performance with the Travis Shook Trio was greeted warmly by a full house. The Seattle Times ran an article by Hugo Kugiya detailing his career’s ups and downs. “The jazz pianist Travis Shook, a curiosity to some who remember his name, a cautionary tale for others, lives in rural, upstate New York, far from the city and the place he first greeted fame. People don’t recognize him much these days, and for a long time he preferred it that way.

“I’m 40 and I feel a lot more comfortable with myself now,” said Shook, a fixture on the Seattle jazz scene in the early 1990s and once considered one of the greatest jazz musicians of his generation. “That’s all that matters to me. Musically, I’m a much better player than I was. But the main thing is that I’m comfortable with myself. That was my biggest hurdle.”

For most, that would seem a small accomplishment, but for Shook, who experienced meteoric success and sudden failure, who was addicted to alcohol and drugs, who was virtually unemployable for a number of years, this is not an insignificant step.

“Comeback,” is the word he settled on.”
Read the rest at The Seattle Times

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it was a delight to see and hear Essiet Essiet perform on the bass behind Shook.

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Matt Jorgensen was great at drums throughout the set.

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Jay Thomas made an appearance as well during the first set.
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Travis looked pleased at the applause at the end of his first set.
Photographs by Seattle Portrait Photographer Daniel Sheehan specializing in photojournalism, portraits and photography for publications and corporations, and photojournalistic Bridal photography.


Travis Shook

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Travis Shook at the piano at Tula’s, Weds September 9th.


Danilo Perez – Jazz Photography

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Photographing Danilo Perez in concert at ast weekend’s 2009 Bellevue Jazz Festival was a lot of fun. He was so unpredictable as he moved around a lot as he played the piano and sometime like here he played on the side of the piano. His music was serious but he made the performance feel fun. This just about wraps up my coverage of the 2009 Bellevue Jazz Festival. Hope you enjoyed it as much as I did.


Bill Anschell Trio – Jazz Photography

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The Bill Anschell Tiro who appeared last weekend at the 2009 Bellevue Jazz Festival performed at the Bellevue Grill to a packed house.


Jazz Photography – Patricia Barber

This blog, eyeshotjazz.wordpress.com is ending here at wordpress.com, but will continue to be updated at the new address for EyeShotJazz at http://www.eyeshotjazz.com/. Please go and set your bookmark to continue to follow the work of Jazz Photographer Daniel Sheehan. Here is the final posting to this site. Also visit his newest website http://www.eyeshotphotos.com to see samples of all of his work as a Seattle Photographer.
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Here is another shot of Patricia Barber from last weekend’s 2009 Bellevue Jazz Festival.


Patricia Barbera

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Singular singer & pianist Patricia Barber put her distinct stamp on a collection of standards and selections from her new release The Cole Porter Mix (2008), a stunning celebration of the great Cole Porter’s songbook in the opening set of the second evening of the Bellevue Jazz Festival Saturday night at theTheatre at Meydenbauer Center


Seattle Photographer – Wayne Horvitz – Sound check

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I photographed Wayne Horvitz during a sound check before his performance at the 2006 Earshot Jazz Festival at the Triple Door. He was laying with the Gravitas Quartet. A beautiful group. What I really like about this photograph is the backlight making almost a complete silhouette. It is really nice to have access to different angles during a soundcheck instead of shooting from the audience. I am going to add this to my editorial website splash page. I like the feeling of it. Maybe it is too quiet?

Photograph by photojournalist Daniel Sheehan specializing in portrait photography for publications and corporations and a photographer in Seattle with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating award winning wedding photography.


Victor Noriega

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Victor Noriega plays with the Paul Rucker Group at The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center on October, 19th, 2008, during the Earshot Jazz Festival.

Victor played great with Paul Ruckers Group during the Festival. I wanted to get in a photo of him but the Festival schedule was too busy to make before now.

Earshot Jazz described his playing as “Victor Noriega has developed a distinct personal style that is both inventive and adventurous… his piano playing is crisp and articulate, and his compositions fuse Classical and Filipino folk elements with a jazz aesthetic. One moment his playing is reminiscent of the intricate contrapuntal lines in a Bach fugue, and the next the percussive dissonance of Bartok’s music for piano… Listening to Noriega perform is like hearing the pieces of a puzzle come together into a satisfying whole.”

Photograph by photojournalist Daniel Sheehan specializing in portrait photography for publications and corporations and  photographers in Seattle with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating award winning  bridal photography.


Larks, They Crazy

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Another photo of Robin Holcomb singing during the performance of Larks, They Crazy at the Seattle Art Museum last month.

Robin Holcomb’s playing and singing were a special treat during the Earshot jazz festival as I was lulled and then moved in some of the more stirring pieces. The pianist/composer/singer performed a reprise of her 1989 landmark Sound Aspects release, Larks, They Crazy. The album featured many of the top-working musicians in New York, including Horvitz, Previte, Marty Ehrlich, Doug Wieselman, and David Hofstra. Like Todos Santos, the album gathered much attention upon its release. Featuring some truly ambitious music, the drama of her compositions well deserves revisiting. Mark Dery of The New York Times wrote: “Ms. Holcomb has done something remarkable here: she has created a new American regionalism, spun from many threads – country rock, minimalism, Civil War songs, Baptist hymns, Appalachian folk tunes, even the polytonal music of Charles Ives. The music that results is as elegantly simple as a Shaker quilt, and no less beautiful.”
Holcomb was joined on stage here by the expansive, irrepressible Skerik on tenor saxophone, old New York friend Doug Wieselman on alto, D’Vonne Lewis on drums, and Geoff Harper on bass.

 


Robin Holcomb


Robin Holcomb: Larks, They Crazy Sunday, November 2, Seattle Art Museum

Robin Holcomb shared the bill with Horvitz/Miles/Previte Trio Sunday night. Her playing and singing were a special treat. I was lulled and then moved in some of the more stirring pieces. The pianist/composer/singer  performed a reprise of her 1989 landmark Sound Aspects release, Larks, They Crazy. The album featured many of the top-working musicians in New York, including Horvitz, Previte, Marty Ehrlich, Doug Wieselman, and David Hofstra. Like Todos Santos, the album gathered much attention upon its release. Featuring some truly ambitious music, the drama of her compositions well deserves revisiting. Mark Dery of The New York Times wrote: “Ms. Holcomb has done something remarkable here: she has created a new American regionalism, spun from many threads – country rock, minimalism, Civil War songs, Baptist hymns, Appalachian folk tunes, even the polytonal music of Charles Ives. The music that results is as elegantly simple as a Shaker quilt, and no less beautiful.”
Holcomb was joined on stage here by the expansive, irrepressible Skerik on tenor saxophone, old New York friend Doug Wieselman on alto, D’Vonne Lewis on drums, and Geoff Harper on bass.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  portrait photographer Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in editorial photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best photographers Seattle.

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Bill Cosby with the SRJO


Bill Cosby sits in with the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra Saturday, November 1, Nordstrom Recital Hall/Benaroya Hall

The Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra is the Northwest’s premier big band jazz ensemble. Founded in 1995, the 17-piece band is made up of the region’s leading jazz instrumentalists, both young and old. Committed to presenting the great works of jazz, the SRJO’s repertoire is drawn from the past 100 years of jazz history, including works by Fletcher Henderson, Charles Mingus, Gil Evans, Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Thad Jones, and of course, Count Basie and Duke Ellington.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best  wedding photographers Seattle.

 

 

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Phil Markowitz

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Phil at the piano Friday night. Phil Markowitz Trio

Friday, October 31 & Saturday, November 1, Tula’s Restaurant

In his 30-year career, pianist and noted jazz educator Phil Markowitz has traversed the history of jazz, from the traditional to the avant-garde, forming early relationships with Chet Baker and Toots Thielemans, as well as lasting affiliations with Dave Liebman and Bob Mintzer. A veteran of the international jazz scene, Markovitz remains committed to exploring the potential of improvisational music within the jazz idiom.
In support of his new studio album Catalysis, Markowitz here teams with his regular trio of bassist Jay Anderson (Maria Schneider Orchestra, Joe Sample, Paul Bley) and drummer Adam Nussbaum (John Scofield, James Moody, John Abercrombie).
Released earlier this year on Sunnyside records, Catalysis explores adventurous compositions ranging
from the romantic to the hard-driving and chromatic, and finds the trio in exceptional form. Featuring
unexpected compositional twists and deeply communicative improvisations, Catalysis is one of Markowitz’s finest and most unique records. And as a preview for tonight’s performance, Catalysis suggests it should be an excellent concert indeed.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by  photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photographer at  A Beautiful Day Photography and one of the best  wedding photographers Seattle.

 

 

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