Posts tagged “jazz photos

Jazz Photography EyeShotJazz Moving to EyeShotJazz.com

Eye Shot Jazz Photography is ending at this URL but continues to be updated with new photography over on the new address for EyeShotJazz blog at EyeShotJazz.com. Please go and set your bookmark to get continuing coverage of the Earshot Jazz Festival, Bellevue Jazz Festival and other photographs of great jazz performances in the Seattle area. Visit my main website danielsheehan.com to see samples of portrait, wedding, corporate and editorial as well as  jazz photography at Daniel Sheehan Photography.

Here is a recent post from the new EyeShotJazz website

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Tenor saxophonist and jazz legend Hadley Caliman, 78, passed away last week after a two year battle with liver cancer. Many of you have seen and heard him over the years as he played a lot around Seattle and Portland. Here are some recent pictures of him. Above he was accepting one of his two awards at the Earshot Jazz Golden Ear Awards in Jan 2009 at the Triple Door.
Below are some recent images of him in performance.


“Caliman remained active on the jazz scene until late-August, performing regularly around the Northwest in support of his recent releases: Reunion with Pete Christilieb, which was released in August and is now #31 on the national jazz charts, and Straight Ahead, which is #9 for the year on the Airplay Charts and was in the Top 10 on American jazz radio for many months.” Read more here on The Seattle Jazz Scene.






Seattle photographer Daniel Sheehan Photography creates portraits for publications and is a Seattle Wedding Photographer with a photojournalist style.


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Daniel Sheehan Photographers in Seattle specializes in photojournalism and portrait photography for publications and corporations and is considered one of  the top wedding photographers in Seattle . He creates award winning wedding photography  and is ranked among the best Seattle photographers.


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Andy Milne


Andy Milne on keyboards on stage at Tulas Sat Oct 25th

Andy Milne’s Dapp Theory blends “contemporary funk, groove and hip-hop into jazz with such seamless, casual precision it’s almost freaky.” (LA Weekly). Keyboardist Milne’s gifted ensemble includes poet John Moon, saxophonist Loren Stillman, bassist Chris Tordini, and drummer Kenny Grohowski. Influenced by Joni Mitchell, KRS One, Thelonious Monk, and Van Halen, Dapp Theory has amassed a loyal following of fans. Milne, a finalist in the Down Beat rising star keyboardist poll category in 2004, was awarded the Chamber Music America “New Works” commission in 2006. Milne’s band mates, who also have impressive
resumes, have worked with some of the top names in jazz today. Established in 1998, Dapp Theory has released three albums, including Layers of Chance on Contrology Records last April.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by editorial photographer Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a Seattle  photographer of weddings with a subtle, unobtrusive, story-telling approach creating artistic documentary photography ranking him as one of the best bridal photographers in Seattle.

 

 

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Four Across

Matt Aronoff, with Four Across at Tula’s Restaurant, Wednesday, October 22 & Thursday, October 23

One of the most promising jazz quartets now on the scene, Four Across makes its Earshot Jazz Festival debut presenting forward-thinking, sensitive jazz that blends folk melody, South American grooves, and New Orleans spirit. With Carmen Staaf on piano, Josh Deutsch on trumpet/flugelhorn, Kendall Eddy on bass, and Brian Adler on drums, this collection of New England Conservatory graduates, many with Seattle ties, released its first album, Four Across, earlier this year and is fresh off an east coast tour.

Bassist Kendall Eddy grew up in Arlington, VA, with stops in Bainbridge Island and Harrisonburg, VA. After studying acoustic bass at James Madison University, he completed a master’s degree at NEC, and now maintains a busy performing and teaching schedule. He has appeared in Japan, Norway, Italy, and across the United States.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by editorial photographer Daniel Sheehan a photojournalist who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. He is also a wedding photojournalist
 


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Eric Vloeimans Fugimundi

Eric VloeimansAt Tulas

One of Europe’s most gifted trumpeters, the Dutchman performed Sunday night  October 19th at Tula’s with his wonderful trio Fugimundi, featuring  Anton Goudsmit who was astounding on guitar and Harmen Fraanje on piano. They ranged from cutting-edge jazz to hymns all presented with virtuosity, warmth, and wit. What a really special treat, one of my favorite performances so far on the second night of the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Photograph by photojournalist Daniel Sheehan an portrait photographer who specializes in portrait photography and photojournalism for publications and corporations. Daniel is also does bridal photography.

 


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The Astounding Anton Goudsmit


Anton Goudsmit takes off on an amazing riff

Eric Vloeimans Fugimundi

One of Europe’s most gifted trumpeters, the Dutchman performed Sunday night at Tula’s with his wonderful trio Fugimundi, featuring  Anton Goudsmit who was astounding on guitar and Harmen Fraanje on piano. They ranged from cutting-edge jazz to hymns all presented with virtuosity, warmth, and wit. What a really special treat, one of my favorite performances so far on the second night of the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival

Portrait Photographer Daniel Sheehan,  photojournalists specializing in corporate portrait photographs  for publications and corporations, and a wedding photographer  Seattle at A Beautiful Day Photography with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach, creating award winning wedding photojournalist, is ranked one of the best Seattle photographers   by the National Association of Wedding Photojournalists.

 

 


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Jerry Gonzalez


Jerry Gonzalez & Fort Apache Band Kick off the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival


Jerry Gonzalez playing trumpet and congas and his fantastic band played to a packed house on the opening night of the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival and got a tremendous response from the audience.

Down Beat called the trumpeter/conguero’s dark, driving, and captivating outfit the “most influential modern Afro-Caribbean Jazz Group of the past 30 years.” Fort Apache has thrilled audiences and set the standard for Latin-jazz mastery.

Click here for the complete schedule for the rest of the upcoming shows at the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival:

Portrait Photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist specializing in portrait photography  for publications and corporations, and a wedding photographer in Seattle at A Beautiful Day Photography with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach, creating award winning wedding photojournalism, is ranked one of the best bridal photographers   by the National Association of Wedding Photojournalists.

 

 


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Jovino Santos Neto Quarteto at EMP

Jovino Santos Neto Quarteto

Jovino Santos Neto Quarteto

Jovino in performance at EMP at the Earshot Jazz 2007 Golden Ear Awards show on Jan. 20th, 2008.

 


Cuong Vu Trio

Another highlight was the performance of the Cuong Vu Trio.

Few young trumpeters inspire as much
excitement as the deliciously melodic Cuong
Vu. While collaborating with such varied
artists as Laurie Anderson, David Bowie,
Dave Douglas, Myra Melford, Cibo Matto,
Mitchell Froom, Chris Speed, Bill Frisell,
and Pat Metheny, Vu has grown into a
heralded composer and bandleader in his
own right.
Drummer Ted Poor and electric bassist
Stomu Takeishi round out the Cuong Vu
Trio. Th e former swings, rocks, and impro-
vises with a facility that belies his mere 25
years. As for Takeishi, Pat Metheny describes his playing as “really the most original…out there right now. He hears into the
music the way that very few people ever
have.”
“Th is band took me about seven years to
form,” Vu muses. “It wasn’t until Stomu
and Ted came into my musical life that I
was able to fi nd the chemistry that I was
looking for.”
Born in Saigon, the 38-year-old Vu im-
migrated to Seattle as a child and began
playing the trumpet a few years later. He
won notice for his performances even
while at the New England Conservatory
of Music on a full scholarship. He has
since been honored by the Colbert Award
for Excellence, a pair of Grammys for
Best Contemporary Jazz Album (with the
Pat Metheny Group) in 2002 and 2006,
and the Italian Jazz Critics’ Society’s Best
International Jazz Artist of 2006.
Behind the international accolades
stands a fearless innovator. As heard on
albums like Bound, It’s Mostly Residual,
and the mind-expanding Th is Th is and
Th at, the emotional range of Vu’s original
works spans the continuum from lush
piles of harmonic melancholy to frenetic,
electrifi ed romps through vertiginous
improvisation.
Vu recently joined the UW jazz faculty,
but don’t expect him to begin cowering
in ivory towers. “I don’t want to disap-
pear,” he insists, “the way it seems to
happen to so many musicians who go
into academia.”
For this year’s festival, the Cuong Vu
Trio will premiere new work commis-
sioned by Earshot Jazz.

Photographers in Seattle Daniel Sheehan, a photojournalist specializing in portrait photography  for publications and corporations, and a wedding photographer at A Beautiful Day Photography with an unobtrusive, story-telling approach, creating award winning wedding photojournalism, is ranked one of the best bridal photographers   by the National Association of Wedding Photojournalists.


Ahmad Jamal

One of the highlights of the 2007 Earshot Jazz Festival for me was the performance of Ahmad Jamal.
It was the firast time I got to see him play after listening to his music for decades.
Here is what they wrote about him in Earshot Jazz Magazine.

Pianist Ahmad Jamal has infused small jazz ensembles with an orchestral spirit for almost half a century, attracting innumerable
accolades: National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master Fellow, Duke Ellington Yale University Fellow, Officer of the French Order of Arts and Letters. Then there are the award-winning recordings,
like Jamal’s seminal “Poinciana,” which took up residence on the Top-10 charts (overall!) for 108 weeks in 1958-60. There are the film credits for music – notably Clint Eastwood’s The Bridges of Madison County – the published music transcriptions, the shopworn excerpts from Miles Davis autobiography, in which he gushes uncharacteristically about Jamal’s influence on the trumpeter’s
own music.
But none of this speaks to the music itself. Here, Jamal’s own words speak ironic volumes. Rather than jazz, Jamal prefers the term “American classical,” and he insists that his trio – with bassist James Cammack and drummer Idris Muhammad
– is instead a “small ensemble.” Yet this “Golden Era” ensemble has proved instrumental in cementing the piano trio as a timeless form for jazz itself. “No musician
has had a more profound effect on the orchestral approach to small group in the last 35 years,” wrote the Village Voice. Make that 50.
Born in Pittsburgh in 1930, Jamal took to the piano very soon after. At age three, he was playing. By seven, he’d begun formal studies. At age 14, the irrefutable
child prodigy joined the musicians union, then promptly finished college master classes while still in high school. Discovered, as it were, by producer John Hammond while playing with his piano/bass/guitar ensemble (The Three Strings), Jamal quickly signed a deal to make a record.
Since then, Jamal has released at least 80 more albums. At their best, they document an incontrovertible genius of American music. As a soloist, Jamal improvises
with matchless clarity, by turns as prominent and fully voiced as an operatic chorus or as fragilely delicate as silence itself. He plays like a conduit, channeling some inexhaustible, unrepeatable source of musical ideas, accessible only to him by cosmic circumstance.
Though he prefers not to say much more about it, Jamal’s stated philosophy is Islam. His recent album, After Fajr, takes its name from the Islamic dawn prayer. Its title track adds Jamal’s choral arrangement and lyrics to the small ensemble.
“I have put the oldest instrument in the world – the human voice – on the track,” he writes in the album’s liner notes. “My audiences have loved it every time we perform it and we hope the entire recording will be a favorite of our fans.”
Those fans include three generations of inspired musicians. From his first collaborators
to recent artists – pop and soul singer John Legend and rappers Common
and Nas – who sample his music, the rippling effect of Jamal’s importance can scarcely be encapsulated.


Jason Moran – Earshot Jazz Festival 2006

I photographed Jason Moran in 2006 during the Earshot Jazz Festival and this was the image used on the poster to promote the 2007 Festival when he returned to play again with his group Bandwagon.

Earshot Jazz described him like this:
Now one of the most prominent talents in jazz, the pianist Jason Moran draws top-notch commissions, infuses his compositions
with theatrical charisma, and carries off a memorable performance in Seattle every time.
Earlier this year, Blue Note released Moran’s Artist in Residence. Like so much of Moran’s growing canon, the album capitalizes expertly on his fascination with pre-recorded materials, his mind for composition, and his technical bravado at the piano. It compiles a series of commissioned
works – MILESTONE, for Minneapolis’s Walker Art Center; The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things, for the Dia Art Foundation; and RAIN, which premiered at Rose Hall (Jazz at Lincoln Center) and was written for Bandwagon, Moran’s staple trio with bassist Taurus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits.
In 2003, Bandwagon released its self-titled live album. Recorded at the Village Vanguard and including interpretations of such surprising songs as hip-hop godfather
Afrika Bambaataa’s “Planet Rock” and Brahms’s “Intermezzo, Op. 118, No. 2,” the release helped Moran’s already growing profile swell even further.
A native of Houston, TX, the 32-year-old Moran has played with contemporary talents like Cassandra Wilson, Steve Coleman, Greg Osby, Stefan Harris, and Sam Rivers, but his star continues to rise thanks primarily to the propulsion of his work as a bandleader and composer. In this capacity Moran also remains a voracious
re-interpreter, finding deep wells of inspiration in stride maestro James P. Johnson, Icelandic dynamo Björk, and 20th-century classical giants Prokofiev and Ravel.
Fittingly, this unpredictable innovator spurs surprising accolades. In 2005, for example, he was awarded Playboy Magazine’s
first “Jazz Artist of the Year” nod. But with Jason Moran, the facts simply can’t encapsulate the energy fuelling the prolific fount of music within the man. Luckily, the Triple Door offers an ideal setting in which to hear this creative maelstrom before his inevitable place in the jazz pantheon assures an end to such intimate performances.

Click here for the complete schedule for the 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival:

 


Thomas Marriott

Thomas is another of my favorite local musicians. Here he is playing at Tula’s during the 2005 Earshot Jazz festival.

Seattle’s 20th annual Earshot Jazz Festival presents more than 50 one-of-a-kind events in concert halls, clubs, and community centers all around the city beginning October 18th and continuing through November 9th.

Known for “adventurous, spot-on programming” (Jazz Times) and praised as “one of the best festivals in America” (Seattle Times) the Earshot Jazz Festival brings important artists from around the world into creative collaboration with area audiences and Seattle’s finest jazz musicians. It celebrates Seattle’s place in the world of jazz — from our award-winning high-school jazz programs to our renowned resident jazz masters — in a world-class festival setting that features many of today’s most important artists.
Some of the highlights planned for this 20th Earshot
Festival include:

NEA Jazz Master James Moody with the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra in a 4-day residency that includes oral history interviews, educational programs, and two concerts
Pioneering avant-garde pianist and NEA Jazz Master Cecil Taylor in a solo concert at Seattle’s Town Hall
Saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and hisquartet at the Triple Door
Pianist Marilyn Crispell in concert at the Chapel Performance Space
Vocalist Simone, daughter of Nina Simone, in concert in Bothell
A collaboration with the Langston Hughes Cultural center that includes concerts by violinist Billy Bang and Seattle jazz legends Julian Priester and Hadley Caliman.
A pre-election concert at Town Hall by bassist Charlie Haden’s Liberation Music Orchestra featuring pianist/arranger Carla Bley.
A 20-year retrospective of internationally-known Seattle resident Wayne Horvitz featuring his groups, The President, New York Composer’s Orchestra West, Pigpen, and Zony Mashwith Horns
Seattle’s award-winning Garfield and Roosevelt High School jazz bands in main stage concerts with guests such as Wycliffe Gordon.
Eastern European prodigy Eldar with veteran singer Nancy King
Japanese pianist Satoko Fujii with Rova’s Larry Ochs
Steven Bernstein’s Millennial Territory Orchestra accompaniment to three Laurel and Hardy films
And many, many more.